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Crowdsourcing My Summer Reading

June 4, 2015

As I already mentioned, I am currently reading What the Buddha Taught by Walpola Rahula. Where should I go next?

Keep in mind that I am a bibliophile. That is, a lover (in the intellectual sense) of books. Therefore, I tend to accumulate more books than I actually have time to read. The following options are from my shelves. I have skimmed or read chapters in a few, while barely breathing on the pages of others.

I leave it up to you, my readers, where I should go next. In addition to the books listed below, you may make your own additions in the comments. I am also a keen fan of audio books for my long commute, so if any are better heard, than read, please let me know.

leadership is an art

Leadership is an Art by Max De Pree

 

Leadership is an Art by Max De Pree. This book was assigned for a course I took last year on ‘connective leadership.’ I admit that I skimmed it only, but it seems worth a deeper read. Although originally published in 1989, my classmates raved about it’s relevance in 2015. I must confess, I felt slightly left out in that class due to my own failure to read the book that week.

The 4 Foundations of Mindfulness in Plain English by Bhante Gunaratana

The 4 Foundations of Mindfulness in Plain English by Bhante Gunaratana

The 4 Foundations of Mindfulness in Plain English by Bhante Gunaratana. This exegesis of the Satipatthana Sutta, that classic Buddhist meditation manual, is the 2012 followup to Bhante’s wildly popular Mindfulness in Plain English, which I have also not read. Should I buy and read Mindfulness first, then 4 Foundations, or is the second book good on its own?

Please Don't Tell by Emma Justes

Please Don’t Tell by Emma Justes

Please Don’t Tell: What to Do with the Secrets People Share by Emma Justes. I was originally drawn to this book precisely because I am often the recipient of other people’s secrets, as I have written about here and here. Sharing a secret can lead to great healing, but it can also create suffering in the person who hears it. It can also create ethical dilemmas between the tension to maintain a trust and prevent harm, which may be possible by sharing rather than keeping another person’s secret. For such a complicated subject, the book is short and appears accessible.

Feeling Wisdom by Rob Preece

Feeling Wisdom by Rob Preece

Feeling Wisdom: Working with Emotions Using Buddhist Teachings and Western Psychology by Rob Preece. I’m becoming more and more interested in Buddhist psychology. I always was, but now that classes are out, I have time to study it. I appreciate that Preece is dealing with emotions, which I am starting to realize drive our behaviors more than we (and previous generations of psychologists) ever thought. I wonder what Buddhism has to say on the matter?

The Heart of the World by Ian Baker

The Heart of the World by Ian Baker

Finally, The Heart of the World: A Journey to Tibet’s Lost Paradise by Ian Baker is the only memoir currently on my list. I find memoirs to often be hit or miss, but in this case the subject matter is certainly intriguing. And it comes with the Dalai Lama’s stamp of approval. It is also the longest book on my list.

So, dear readers, I place this into your hands. Remember that you can also make new suggestions in the comments. What should I read next this summer?

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